Last edited by Tugar
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

6 edition of Sacajawea, Shoshone trailblazer found in the catalog.

Sacajawea, Shoshone trailblazer

by Diane Shaughnessy

  • 60 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by PowerKids Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sacagawea, -- Juvenile literature.,
  • Sacagawea.,
  • Shoshoni women -- Biography -- Juvenile literature.,
  • Shoshoni Indians -- Biography -- Juvenile literature.,
  • Shoshoni Indians -- Biography.,
  • Indians of North America -- Biography.,
  • Women -- Biography.

  • About the Edition

    A biography of the Shoshoni Indian girl who served as interpreter, peacemaker, and guide for the Lewis and Clark Expedition to the Northwest in 1805-1806.

    Edition Notes

    Includes index.

    StatementDiane Shaughnessy, Jack Carpenter.
    GenreJuvenile literature.
    SeriesFamous Native Americans
    ContributionsCarpenter, Jack, 1944-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsF592.7.S123 S53 1997
    The Physical Object
    Pagination24 p. :
    Number of Pages24
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL671647M
    ISBN 100823951073
    LC Control Number97017642
    OCLC/WorldCa37037337

      According to John Heaton, in his book The Shoshone-Bannocks: Culture and Commerce at Fort Hall, “At the moment of their first contact, then, . - Explore Jeannie Rapstad's board "Sacajawea" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Sacagawea, Lewis and clark, Shoshone pins.

    Sacagawea belonged to the Lemhi Shoshone band of Northern Shoshones who lived in the Tendoy/Salmon Idaho area. The Lemhi-Shoshone tribe is made up of the Agaidikas or Salmon-Eater Shoshone and the Tukidikas or Sheep-Eater Shoshone. Sacagawea belonged to the Agaidikas and is the most well-known member of the Shoshone. His compelling and informative account should help to bring Sacajawea’s people out of the long shadow of history and restore them to their rightful place in the American story. Author Bio John W. W. Mann is a visiting assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire.

    Sacagawea was the only girl, and the only Native American, to join Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery, which explored the United States from the Mississippi River all the way to the Pacific Ocean in the early s. As a translator, she helped the team communicate with members of the Shoshone . Starting with Sacajawea, the Shoshone guide for Lewis and Clark, Women of the West gives a historical overview of various pioneers: Narcissa Whitman, trailblazer to Oregon and missionary to the Indians; Esther Morris and Carrie Chapman Catt, leaders for women’s suffrage; Susette “Bright Eyes” La Flesche, the first Indian woman to become a.


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Sacajawea, Shoshone trailblazer by Diane Shaughnessy Download PDF EPUB FB2

Sacajawea: Shoshone Trailblazer (Famous Native Americans) Hardcover – January 1, by Diane Carpenter Shaughnessy (Author)5/5(1). This book is a biography of the Shoshone Indian girl who served as interpreter, peacemaker, and guide for the Lewis and Clark Expedition to the Northwest in Sacajawea of the Shoshone is a beautifully depicted, educational book for children to learn about Native American culture and the life of a brave Shoshone girl named Sacajawea.

Journey with Lewis and Clark, Charbonneau, and Sacajawea and her young son, Pomp, as they map out the American West and discover new lands and territories/5. A biography of Sacajawea Shoshoni Indian girl who served as interpreter, peacemaker, and guide for the Lewis and Clark Expedition to the Northwest in Sacajawea, Shoshone trailblazer.

[Diane Shaughnessy; Jack Carpenter] -- A biography of the Shoshoni Indian girl who served as interpreter, peacemaker, and guide for the Lewis and Clark Expedition to the Northwest in Your Web browser is not enabled for JavaScript.

Some features of WorldCat will not be available. Sacajawea of the Shoshone book. One minute she was picking berries and the next her tribe was under attack. Running for her life, Sacajawea was scooped up and taken far away from her village and family—and into history.

Sacajawea, an iconic figure in United States history, became a legend for guiding explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark through the newly acquired Louisiana Territory from to Yim's account of Sacajawea's story vacillates between straightforward facts. By Lise Erdrich, Illustrated by Julie Buffalohead This is a biography of the Shoshone girl, Sacagawea, from age eleven when she was kidnapped by the Hitdatsa to the end of her journey with Lewis and Clark, plus speculation about her later life.

Shoshone. The quaint and cozy Shoshone Rooms comfortably accommodate up to two guests. Following tradition, each Shoshone room offers the finest amenities. Available with a full bed.

Located on the first, second and third floors. Select rooms available with a hand-crafted claw-foot tub and shower. Select rooms are pet friendly. Sacagawea, the daughter of a Shoshone chief, was captured by an enemy tribe and sold to a French Canadian trapper who made her his wife around age In Novembershe was invited to join the.

A portrait of the life of Sacajawea includes coverage of the attack on her childhood Shoshone tribe, her selection as a guide by Lewis and Clark, and her travels beyond the boundaries held by other women of her time. Download. "I am Sacagawea" is another fantastic book in the "Ordinary People Change the World" series.

Many other subjects achieved greatness as adults but I loved the way this book highlights Sacagawea's amazing accomplishments as a teenage girl, and a Native American at s: Sacagawea (/ s ə ˌ k ɑː ɡ ə ˈ w iː ə /; also Sakakawea or Sacajawea; May c.

– Decem or April 9, ) was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who, at met and helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition in achieving their chartered mission objectives by exploring the Louisiana wea traveled with the expedition thousands of miles from North Dakota to the Pacific.

The bilingual Shoshone woman Sacagawea (c. – ) accompanied the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery expedition in from the. Sacagawea, also spelled Sacajawea, (born c. near the Continental Divide at the present-day Idaho-Montana border [U.S.]—died Decem ?, Fort Manuel, on the Missouri River, Dakota Territory), Shoshone Indian woman who, as interpreter, traveled thousands of wilderness miles with the Lewis and Clark Expedition (–06), from the.

However, Shoshone oral history describes Sacajawea living a nomadic life, finally appearing at the Wind River Reservation and dying there inan old woman. I'd like to believe the latter myself. It's tragic to think she survivied the hardships of the Lewis and Clark expedition only to die so young, leaving two young children behind.

Sacajawea threw her blanket around his shoulders and exclaimed, "We are of one blanket!" (Belcher-Hamilton, 26, ) Then she sucked on her fingers. This was a Shoshone tradition that meant, "You are from my tribe, the people who suckled me.". In July ofthe Corps was paddling up the Missouri, and Sacagawea recognized the landmarks—the three forks in the water, where three smaller rivers come together to form the Missouri.

On Aug the expedition met up with the Shoshone tribe. Lewis and Clark arranged for a meeting with the chief, Cameawait, and Sacagawea acted as. Diane Shaughnessy is the author of Sacajawea ( avg rating, 5 ratings, 1 review, published ), Pocahontas ( avg rating, 3 ratings, 1 review, pu 4/5(3).

The story certainly fit with the popular portrayal of Sacagawea in the early s, thanks in large part to Eva Emery Dye’s book The Conquest: The True Story of Lewis and Clark. Sacajawea, the quiet 16 year-old mother [Clark's journals calculated her to be 19], became an invaluable member of the Expedition because of her knowledge of the Shoshone homeland they would pass through.

One of her most important contributions to Lewis and Clark was to reassure them that they were indeed on the route to the westward passage to.Sacagawea died of "putrid fever" on Dec. 20,or maybe not. Shoshone oral tradition says she returned to the Shoshones and settled at the Wind River reservation in modern-day Wyoming.

Tribal tradition says she died on April 9,and is buried there. A slave, an Indian and a woman, Sacagawea received little respect during her lifetime.Lewis was particularly happy to learn that she had saved his indispensable botany reference book.

In gratitude for her quick thinking, Lewis and Clark decided to name one of the newly found Missouri River tributaries "Sacajawea." Unfortunately, the name didn't stick, however.

On June 3,the expedition reached the Marias River.